Scots Roots


Chanonry Point
January 27, 2017, 12:04 pm
Filed under: Photographs, Wildlife | Tags: , ,

Chanonry Point 1The best place in the UK to see bottlenose dolphins is at Chanonry Point, a small spit of land on the Moray Firth, where the firth narrows between the Point and Fort George.

Chanonry Point 3Most often seen on a rising tide not long after the tide turns, the dolphins like to play in the strong currents as they chase the fish in.

Chanonry Point 2The shingle beach at the Point often hosts large crowds of people as they watch the dolphins feeding just metres away.

Chanonry Point 4A lighthouse is situated at the point. Designed by Alan Stevenson, uncle of Robert Louis Stevenson, the lighthouse was first lit in 1846 but has been fully automated since 1984.

Chanonry Point 5

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Verdant Works, Dundee
January 13, 2017, 10:59 am
Filed under: Photographs, Scottish History | Tags: , ,

Verdant Works 1In the 19th century, Dundee was the world’s largest producer of jute products. Over 50,000 people were employed in more than 100 mills by the end of the century and the population of Dundee had virtually quadrupled from 45,000 to 161,000.

Verdant Works 2Ideally placed on the Tay estuary, Dundee already had a thriving textile industry, a large whaling fleet and its own shipbuilding industry. They built the big ships needed to bring the raw jute across from India, the whaling industry provided the whale oil necessary for softening the jute fibres ready for processing and the existing textile workers were retrained to process the jute.

Verdant Works 3Jute is quite a rough fibre and is used to make sacking, burlap, twine, canvas, rope etc. The sails on the ships carrying Scots settlers to new lives in the U.S.A., Australia and New Zealand and the tents and covers on the wagons that carried them across these lands were made from jute.

Wars were very popular with the jute barons in Dundee and the 19th century had no shortage of conflicts. These fuelled a great demand for tents, horse blankets, covers for wagons and guns, sandbags and sacks for carrying all sorts of produce.

Verdant Works 4Although jute production made the mill owners very rich, the mill workers were poorly paid and working conditions were dreadful. Most of the workers were women and children because they could be paid less.

Verdant Works 5The industry in Dundee began to decline in the 20th century when the mill owners realised that they could set up jute mills in India and employ cheap local labour.

Today there are no working mills in Dundee. Many have been demolished, others turned into housing, offices or social clubs.

Verdant Works is a former working mill which has been converted into a museum by Dundee Heritage Trust. Originally built in 1833 and extended in 1870, it opened as a museum in 1996. Most of the machinery in Verdant Works came from Dundee College of Technology when its textile course closed in the 1980s. Other items were donated by the public. It’s a really interesting place to visit.

Verdant Works 6

Verdant Works 7




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